Egg-xactly: Eating organic eggs does not increase your risk for cardiovascular disease

Friday, June 01, 2018 by

Eggs are sometimes referred to as “nature’s perfect food,” and it’s easy to see why. They’re healthy, easy to digest, and complete, and consuming them can even help you reduce your weight. Full of nutrients like B-vitamins, iron and zinc, they’re also incredibly nutritious. With so many benefits, you’d think everyone would be eating eggs all the time, but they’re not. Unfortunately, many people still believe the myth that eggs raise your cholesterol, even though study after study has shown this isn’t the case.

In fact, a new study from the University of Sydney has shown that eating as many as 12 eggs a week over the course of a year doesn’t raise cardiovascular risk factors among those with type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes. The study‘s initial trial saw participants try to maintain their weight while eating a low-egg diet (fewer than two eggs per week) or a high-egg diet (12 eggs per week). After three months, there were no differences in the cardiovascular risk markers between the two groups.

The same subjects then went on a diet to lose weight for three months while maintaining the same egg consumption. They were followed up for an additional six months after that, providing a year’s worth of data on metrics such as blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar.

The participants in both groups did not experience any negative changes in their cardiovascular risk markers at any stage, and their weight loss was very similar. The researchers say that eating eggs is not dangerous to people as long as it’s part of a healthy diet; those in the study replaced saturated fats with fats like olive oil and avocado.

The study’s lead author, Dr. Nicholas Fuller, said that even though eggs do have a lot of dietary cholesterol and diabetics typically have higher cholesterol levels, the current study supports previous findings that consuming eggs doesn’t affect cholesterol levels.

In fact, eggs contain a fatty substance known as lecithin that breaks down cholesterol and fat and keeps them from sticking to the walls in your arteries. When taken daily, lecithin has been shown to reduce bad cholesterol while raising good cholesterol.

It’s “eggs-cellent” news for diabetics and everyone else because eggs have so many health benefits. Dr. Fuller said: “Eggs are a source of protein and micronutrients that could support a range of health and dietary factors including helping to regulate the intake of fat and carbohydrate, eye and heart health, healthy blood vessels and healthy pregnancies.”

Getting the most out of nature’s perfect food

If you want to get the most out of your eggs, you need to choose the right ones and prepare them properly. Organic eggs are the best choice as they have the highest lecithin levels.

When it comes to preparation, it’s important to know that microwaving and overcooking them in general can destroy the lecithin in the yolks that counterbalances cholesterol. Poaching and cooking them sunny side up are the best methods of preparation if you want to preserve their nutrients.

Of course, you’ll also need to be cautious about what you pair with your eggs. Eggs and bacon might be a classic combination, but you can forget about healthy cholesterol levels if you eat foods like bacon and sausages, which have also been linked to a higher cancer risk. Instead, pair your eggs with nutrient-packed foods like spinach, peppers, tomatoes, mushrooms, or avocado for maximum health benefits.

Sources for this article include:

ScienceDaily.com

NaturalNews.com



Comments

comments powered by Disqus